Monthly Archives: June 2013

SOUTHERN MEXICO PART 2

FRIDAY JUNE 21ST – DAY 16 – PUERTO ESCONDIDO – TUXTLA GUTIERREZ
We woke up that morning on some restaurant´s beach chairs, once again to the sound of pounding surf. After a quick spin-cycle bath in the waves it was on to tuxtla-gutierrez. 350 miles away. We were both kind of dreading the distance but I had a friend there and we had to make it in one day. We passed through beautiful winding roads through dense vegetation then onto long straights with windmills on both sides for miles. Even at 65 mph the air was hot/humid enough to make us sweat.
After ascending through a gnarly mountain highway we arrived in Tuxtla-Gutierrez around 5 PM. My friend Jaime was there to welcome us and took us around the city briefly and then to a giant burrito restaurant. Once again our hosts were EXTREMELY gracious and tried to make us feel as comfortable as possible during our stay.

waking up to some swell in Puerto Escondido
waking up to some swell in Puerto Escondido
En route to Chiapas
En route to Chiapas
We were struggling with the crosswinds here.. apparently during october semis get blown over on this road. hence the wind mills.
We were struggling with the crosswinds here.. apparently during october semis get blown over on this road. hence the wind mills.
The mountain pass between arriaga and tuxtla guttierrez
The mountain pass between arriaga and tuxtla guttierrez
Real men buy big burritos
Real men buy big burritos

SATURDAY JUNE 22ND –DAY 17 – TUXTLA GUTIERREZ
Originally we planned on only staying the night in tuxtla and continuing onto Guatemala the next day. Jaime convinced us we´d be making the mistake of our lives by not staying a day or two in the state of Chiapas. It didn´t disappoint. Jaime woke us up early for our first activity – A boat tour through the sumidero canyon. Steep green canyon walls, monkeys, and TONS of…crocodiles. Apparently we have to watch where we swim from now on.
Later we took a stroll through an old colonial town, ate pineapple popsicles and drank posol (a traditional drink made from corn and cacao) from a coconut. We continued on to San Cristóbal from there, which I am deeming the Park City, UT of Mexico. Trendy, fancy, cultural city. Tons of Europeans go there to live and visit. Finally, we visited the caves of rancho nuevo, hired a 12-year-old indigenous guide who spoke and told hilarious jokes in monotone, and then ate some giant corn tortilla quesadillas and fried bananas in creme. DELICIOUS!

sitting in front of the symbol of the state of chiapas
sitting in front of the symbol of the state of chiapas. When the Spanish invaded, some of the Indians prefered to throw themselves off the highest point in this canyon (3000 feet above the water) instead of being conquered.
our boat was somewhat similar to this one
our boat was somewhat similar to this one
"the christmas tree" waterfall
“the christmas tree” waterfall
"The christmas tree" waterfall from below
“The christmas tree” waterfall from below
one of our many reptilian friends we made
one of our many reptilian friends we made
the streets of san cristobal de las casas in Chiapas
the streets of san cristobal de las casas in Chiapas

SUNDAY JUNE 23RD – DAY 18 – TUXTLA GUTIERREZ – PALENQUE
Early church with Jaime, followed by our first oil change at almost 4000 miles and then chain adjustments. Jaime again convinced us that we´d regret not visiting Palenque so we waited one more day on Guatemala and hit the road east towards the ancient mayan ruins.
We climbed to nearly 8000 ft and went right into the clouds once again. We got wet, then cold, then miserable. First we went through cold, high altitude villages where all women were wearing the same purple dress then we dropped into the sweaty depths of the jungle where you either leave your visor down and get hot or use just your sunglasses and get pelted in the face with airsoft pellets (bugs). I generally prefer pain over sweat.
We arrived in Palenque just as it was getting dark and paid $10 each for the penthouse suite at a ¼-star hotel. Air conditioning was an optional extra $10. We declined.

oil change and chain tightening before entering guatemala
oil change and chain tightening before entering guatemala
Heading for the clouds outside of Tuxtla
Heading for the clouds outside of Tuxtla
Break time on the way to Palenque
Break time on the way to Palenque
Going deeper
Going deeper
This was our view for 3 hours of winding roads
This was our view for 3 hours of winding roads
At one point during the trip to palenque my tools spilled all over the highway in the middle of nowhere. Within a minute or two of us stopping we hear voices coming from the jungle. Out pops one guy speaking an indigenous dialect then we hear other excited voices.  They kind of knew spanish and wanted to know what we were doing. They spent the next 10 minutes helping me find every socket that dropped from the bike then they disappeared in the jungle again. Where they came from... i still don´t know, we were 20 miles from the nearest civilization.
At one point during the trip to palenque my tools spilled all over the highway in the middle of nowhere. Within a minute or two of us stopping we hear voices coming from the jungle. Out pops one guy speaking an indigenous dialect then we hear other excited voices. They kind of knew spanish and wanted to know what we were doing. They spent the next 10 minutes helping me find every tool and socket that dropped from the bike then they disappeared in the jungle again. Where they came from… i still don´t know, we were 20 miles from the nearest civilization.
Hotel parking garage. chase tipped his bike over onto the glass the next morning. haha luckily nothing broke
Hotel parking garage (lobby). chase tipped his bike over onto the glass the next morning. haha luckily nothing broke
Our penthouse accomodations.
Our penthouse accomodations

MONDAY JUNE 24TH – DAY 19 – PALENQUE – HUEHUETENANGO, GUATEMALA
We awoke to the soothing melodies of various 10,000 watt speaker systems just below our room, advertising different breakfast promotions and other commodities. We ate our last Mexican meal. Eggs with chorizo, rice, black beans and of course, corn tortillas. We traveled the 5 minutes to the ruins and spent about an hour and a half walking around. The mayans had a pretty cool setup there. We left Palenque around noon and got back on the same road we came in on. More jungle, followed by higher altitudes and pine trees. We found a road that wasn´t on my GPS and it turned out to be a huge shortcut down the mountain to the Guatemalan border. All day with almost no rain. Hallelujah!
Guatemala to be continued!

Palenque! ..with tarps on it..
Palenque! ..with tarps on it..
The mayan ball court. Soccer runs in these people´s blood.
The mayan ball court. Soccer runs in these people´s blood.
more temple stuff.
more temple stuff.
somewhere up in the mountain
somewhere up in the mountain
Welcome to Guatemala!
Welcome to Guatemala!

SOUTHERN MEXICO PART 1

DEAD ARMS, DEAD WOMAN AND 3600 MILES AND COUNTING!

DAY 12 SAN LUIS POTOSÍ – MEXICO CITY

waking up in clean sheets is a real treat!  We spent most of the morning eating our world-class continental breakfast, showering WITH hot water, and using the internet. Around 3 PM we said goodbye to our luxurious accomodations and headed south towards Mexico City. The terrain started out arid but soon turned green as we approached the Mexico City valley and its infamous smog bank. We arrived in Mexico City just as it was getting dark to realize that the directions to my friend marko´s house were worthless. After a couple hours of mind blowing, crazy, intense traffic and frustration we arrived. We found Marko and went straight for the nearest taco stand. then bed.

Here comes the herd!
Here comes the herd!
Descending into the Mexico City Valley.
Descending into the Mexico City Valley.
The infamous smog bank of Mexico City (Mexico D.F.)
The infamous smog bank of Mexico City (Mexico D.F.)

DAY 13 – JUNE 18TH – MEXICO CITY
Stomach problems for Chase once again. He´ll be going on the bread diet from here on out. In the morning we went to the doctor. A 3 minute walk from the house. The doctor recommended several different drugs for pain, irritation, infection, etc. Lucky for us Marko´s dad sells drugs, (the good kind) so we got everything cheap. The doctor charged chase $2.50 for the visit. Not bad!

The rest of the day I hung out with Marko and some neighbors and talked about motorcycles for like 5 hours while Chase laid in bed.

Pobre Chase
Pobre Chase

DAY 14 – JUNE 19TH – MEXICO CITY – ACAPULCO
That morning we said farewell to our friends in Mexico City and set off for the ancient ruins of Teotihuacan. 15 miles away. It was a quick trip. We went to the top of the sun pyramid to make peace with the sun god and got back on the road towards Acapulco. Unfortunately for us, Mexico City was in our way. There´s no way around it. It took about an hour and a half to make it through the traffic and back onto open road. From the city we climbed to 10,000 feet into some foreest and then back down a mountain into what i´m going to call jungle. For the first time ever, we are surrounded by dense dark green vegetation. But the ´jungle´comes with heat and humidity.

That quickly disappeared as mother nature hurled a thunderstorm at us. No jackets this time, or boots. We were soaked through in less than a minute. During the rainstorm we passed through a small city. It was extremely refereshing to feel the brown street water drench my chest and helmet from passing buses. Hopefully those Hepatitis shots are kicking in.

I would have caught the action on my GoPro but the battery just fried.  Hopefully Chase´s camera can pick up the slack.

We made it to Acapulco (a disgusting city) before dusk and found the gated hotel community area to our liking. As usual, we pulled up and some stranger was there to tell us where to put our motorcycles for security and where to camp. He also provided us with a little bungalow and chairs. We bought him a liter of milk for his mom and tipped the guard 65 cents for his troubles. Tuna sandwhiches then sleep.

It´s a calf burner
It´s a calf burner
On top of the Sun Pyramid
On top of the Sun Pyramid
Storm approaching
Storm approaching
Dropping into Acapulco after a thorough drenching
Dropping into Acapulco after a thorough drenching

DAY 15 – JUNE 20TH – ACAPULCO – PUERTO ESCONDIDO
We left our our little bungalow around 9 am and got on some of the most fun roads of the trip. In my opinion. The jungle got a lot thicker here towards the coast. The roads were always curvy but rarely any hairpins. It was hot though. Even at 65 mph we were both sweating. But there were a few special highlights.

Chase almost rear ended me when I braked for one of the 10,000 speed bumps we´ve crossed so far.

Side note… Mexico is an interesting place. They substitute paying police for traffic/speed control with some cleverly (and not so cleverly) placed speed bumps. BUT. They don’t like spending money on cones and road signs for construction. They use people with flags instead. We pass 30-40 flag twirlers on any given day as we pass through construction zones. They must be cheeper than cones. Whatever.
Other highlight of the ride. We came up on a group of wild west, shotgun toting, ammo-belt-wearing farmer-policemen on the side of the road. I thought it was strange. Then I saw what they were standing around, which was even stranger. An elderly woman in colorful indian garb lay flat on her back dead with a look of horror still in her face. No blood. Just dead on the side of the road. We{ve seen a lot of dead stuff on the side of the road. This was the first dead human. Hopefully the last.

We pulled into Puerto Escondido, “the mexican pipeline,” around 3 pm. The waves were huge but blown out. Sizing it up I got super nervous. I had to surf. No matter the conditions. I found a dude from LA that gave me all the details on the break and I ended up paddling out with him a couple hours later when the wind died down. I paid 50 pesos for a nice fatty shortboard and spent about an hour and a half out in the water. The whole experience went like this…

On the paddle out (through smaller waves on the north side of the break) I was a little sketched out. Got held under a couple times for quite a while. But it was fine. When I made it to the main break the biggest sets came through with face heights at a good 16 feet and HEAVY! I caught 2 waves and air dropped on a third into oblivion. Everytime I got caught on the inside I´d take 3-4 waves on the head, get shoved to the sand, wait 5 seconds and push up as hard as possible. I was disoriented everytime. On one hold down my board smacked my tricep hard enough to give me a dead arm for a sec. I got a third wave and called it a day. To give you some additional perspective on the power of the waves, 2 dudes of the 10 of us that were out there snapped their boards. Glad I got to experience the mexican pipeline with only a slight bruise on my tricep.

Now off to bed on some part of the sand.

Good Morning Acapulco
Good Morning Acapulco
Leaving Acapulco for Puerto Escondido
Leaving Acapulco for Puerto Escondido
jungly-river-habitat
jungly-river-habitat
After my beat down
After my beat down

Update on Chase. When asked how his stomach was feeling. He gave me a smile, a the thumbs up and said he farted a couple hours ago!

NORTHERN MEXICO

2600 MILES DOWN!

DAY 5 CONTINUED.. TOPOLOBAMPO – CULIACÁN
8 hours waiting/listening to blaring mexican trumpet and accordion music came to a sweet end when we arrived at Topolobampo. It was 10 pm and we were more than 2 hours away from our destination. A friend´s house in Culiacán. 2 hours turned into 3 when the ´federales´ pulled me over for doing 15 mph over in a city area. I was guilty. Stupid. Haha, it was obvious what the cop did next was well practiced.
First he shows me his radar gun. The evidence. Then he confiscates my lisence and tells me I can pay in the morning when the office opens. Not happening! I try asking if there is any way I can pay the fine now. He pretends to act as if that´s not really possible but then asks what I want to pay for the infraction. I say 20 bucks and he just shakes his head like it´s a disgrace. Haha, as if I should be ashamed for offering so little. He gets out his clipboard and writes the “amount” for the ticket. Some ridiculously precise number around $100. After a few minutes I bring him down to $40, he has me slip it to him discreetly onto his clipboard and away we go! What a treat!
It wasn´t til around 2 AM that we finally went to bed at my friend´s house.

DAY 6 CULIACÁN – MAZATLÁN
That morning we “slept in” til 9 AM and then my friend, Cesar, and his wife made us breakfast, lunch, helped us with our laundry and gave us a computer to use. That morning we realized that they had given up their own bed for us to sleep in.. Mexican hospitality on this trip has blown both of us away. I replaced rear brakes on my steed and we left for Mazatlán. Before leaving the city we had one more run-in with the locals. While battling traffic in the city a dog comes out of nowhere and latches onto Chase´s foot. Haha, I was cracking up. (don’t worry family, it didn’t penetrate the boot. No Rabies!)
From there we traveled through what looked like what I imagine the forest from beauty and the beast to look like during the day. We arrived at Mazatlan a couple of hours later and pulled up to the beach on the north end of all the hotels, just in front of a restaurant on a rocky point. We took off our helmets and asked a group of older men where to go for camping on the beach. One guy gets up and says “right here!” pointing at the beach in front of the restaurant and then gives us his business card. It’s the owner of the restaurant. He has us put our motorcycles inside the restaurant for security and then gives us a tour of the restaurant. He shows us the bathrooms and the shower and then introduces us to all 20 workers by name. haha, they were all so friendly I thought for a minute that maybe they were up to something. They just wanted to know about our trip and seemed genuinely concerned to make sure we were perfectly comfortable camping there in front of the restaurant. It was a perfect spot.

Cesar and his wife, Gretel.
Cesar and his wife, Gretel.
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Dead trees on all sides. wierd.
On our way to Mazatlan
On our way to Mazatlan
please excuse that horrible camera chord and focus on the grandeur of our location. the restaurant was 50 yards to our left and there was an empty rocky point to our right.
please excuse that horrible camera chord and focus on the grandeur of our location. the restaurant was 50 yards to our left and there was an empty rocky point to our right.
These little critters were crawling all over the place.
These little critters were crawling all over the place.
Another angle of our campsite in Mazatlan.
Another angle of our campsite in Mazatlan.

DAY 7 MAZATLÁN – CUENCAMÉ
We woke up the next morning for a delicious swim in the waves and got back on the road. Between Mazatlan and Durango (further inland and over the mountains) is the “Espinazo del Diablo” or “The Devil´s Backbone.” 100+ miles of switchbacks, blind corners, random farm animals and semi trucks that go around corners at full speed in the opposite lane. The view was beautiful and the road was a blast. After traveling through the Devil´s backbone we arrived at a small pueblo, cuencamé, after what seemed like the longest 250 miles we´ve ever done. Upon arriving the Devil wasn´t done with us. He paid me a visit in the bathroom too. I wasn´t too happy about it. Neither was Chase who got the same Mexican-bathroom-welcome the next day. That night we paid about $10 each for a dumpy motel. It was a slice of heaven for my aching body.. even with a leaky roof AND a cold shower AND rolling blackouts AND strange smells.

the start of our 9000 ft ascent through the devil´s backbone
the start of our 9000 ft ascent through the devil´s backbone
here´s his backbone..
here´s his backbone..
..more backbone.
..more backbone.
Curves for dayz
Curves for dayz
Check out the semi in front, this is the only pic I got of it happening.  But on the right hand turns the semis swing out all the way into the other lane at full speed. notice his right tires on the yellow... haha i guess we were lucky we never saw this head on...
Check out the semi in front, this is the only pic I got of it happening. But on the right hand turns the semis swing out all the way into the other lane at full speed. notice his right tires on the yellow… haha i guess we were lucky we never saw this head on…
skid marks. a common sight.
skid marks. a common sight.
Cliff on one side. Drop-off on the other.
Cliff on one side. Drop-off on the other.
Road Hog
Road Hog

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The trees changed from semi tropical to alpine-esque
The trees changed from semi tropical to alpine-esque

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feelin crappy but happy in our 5 star motel.
feelin crappy but happy in our 5 star motel.

DAY 8 CUENCAMÉ – SALTILLO
Grass. Dirt. Cows. Donkeys. Canteloupe. Lots of people piled into trucks. Farmland. Straight roads. Nothing to entertain us but some wize Mexican proverbs on the street signs that say things like “Don´t leave rocks on the highway!” or “Don´t set the pavement on fire!”
We were both pretty uncomfortable during the ride. Gas station bathrooms became a place of sanctuary. The only excitement that day was riding right through the center of a dust devil and getting a bunch of rocks in my face. Later that day we arrived at a family´s house that I met and taught while on my mission. In typical Mexican fashion they put every effort into making sure we were taken care of, especially Chase, who was still feeling terrible. They put him in his own room where he got the pampering of his life. The women knew exactly what to do to help him feel better. Mexican hospitality is unrivaled! We both slept like we were at home that night.

Chase during one of our bathroom breaks.
Chase during one of our bathroom breaks.
typical sight here in the nothingness of northern mexico
typical sight here in the nothingness of northern mexico
we´d pass through a pueblo like this every 15 minutes or so.
we´d pass through a pueblo like this every 15 minutes or so.
I have NO idea what this thing is... it was a hole in the middle of nowhere with black smoke just pouring out of it. no civilization in sight, just a hole with smoke pouring out.  ???
I have NO idea what this thing is… it was a hole in the middle of nowhere with black smoke just pouring out of it. no civilization in sight, just a hole with smoke pouring out. ???
NOTHING.
NOTHING.
gettin comfy on the long straights.
gettin comfy on the long straights.
The road to Saltillo
The road to Saltillo
coming into Saltillo
coming into Saltillo

DAY 9 SALTILLO – MONTERREY
Chase still wasn´t feeling great so we stuck around awhile while I visited old friends. Around 5 PM we left Saltillo for Monterrey. 1 hour away. We visited a couple friends from my mission. It got a little late so a family gave us one of their cars to take around the city. That was weird. Driving a car around Monterrey, my old stomping grounds. That night we slept in the best spot in all of monterrey. The roof of the missionaries house. City lights and a strong cool breeze.

Coming into Monterrey!
Coming into Monterrey!
our penthouse. Paco, one of the neighbors joined us both nights.
our penthouse. Paco, one of the neighbors joined us both nights.

DAY 10 MONTERREY
We stuck around monterrey visiting 4 or 5 different families, each of which forced us to eat a giant plate of food. Typical. Not complaining either.
My friends here told us that the drug violence was particularly bad a year ago in the area. People were getting killed and were getting hung from bridges over the main roads on a regular basis. One of my friends, Luis, drives a city bus here. One morning at around 5 AM he saw one of the bodies hanging from a bridge in front of him. He was scared the drug cartel guys were still around so he just hits the gas and nails the dead dudes legs with the top of the bus. That sounds like a pretty terrible story but the way he told it was hilarious. He said it wasn´t that big of a deal, he only had a few people on the bus.
Luis and his wife took us to a great place to see the whole city and then we returned to our rooftop suite.

One of our many meals that day. With balloons and everything.
One of our many meals that day. With balloons and everything.
the famous "cerro de la silla" of monterrey.  In english, "saddleback mountain"
the famous “cerro de la silla” of monterrey. In english, “saddleback mountain”
There isn´t a prettier city in the world at twilight!
There isn´t a prettier city in the world at twilight!
eating the famous Campechana on the roof.  The world´s most delicous taco.  Only in Monterrey! Also, someone I taught here in the mission made me shave.. bummer. oh well.
eating the famous Campechana on the roof. The world´s most delicous taco. Only in Monterrey!
Also, someone I taught here in the mission made me shave.. bummer. oh well.

DAY 11 MONTERREY – SAN LUIS POTOSÍ
We got up that morning, threw some water in our hair and put on some wrinkly church clothes. We visited 2 different wards, got to see a lot of old familiar faces and then ate lunch with a wonderful family. We got back on the road around 3 PM. No more detours from here.
On the ride we hit our first rainstorm and realized… our jackets aren´t waterproof, neither are our boots, or our pants, or really anything. It was perfectly miserable but I was enjoying being back on the road. After topping off our oil and getting some much needed supplies at a Walmart in Matehuala we continued heading south.

At some point in the ride while fidgeting with my ipod, it dropped onto the highway while doing 65 mph. I looked back in horror as my beloved travel companion went tumbling into its imminent destruction. I pulled over, ran back to my old friend, plugged in my headphones and to my amazement everything worked… minus the screen. I told Chase to wip out the camera to take a picture of the miracle. As he did so, the 30 mph crosswinds we were experiencing knocked my bike over on its kickstand. It did a full barrel roll on the side of the highway down a little slope. I looked back at my motorcycle and then back at chase. Then he took the photo. Just some crooked handlebars and mirrors. She started right up and we continued riding another hour or so with crosswinds and semi trucks forcing our bikes to almost 45 degrees to stay heading straight. It was pretty nerve-racking and we rewarded ourselves with a good hotel. Really, the only one we could find. Tomorrow we should make it to Mexico City.

Right before the smiles got wiped off our faces when we realized our jackets weren´t waterproof.
Right before the smiles got wiped off our faces when we realized our jackets weren´t waterproof.
cruisin´ between Monterrey and San Luis Potosí.
cruisin´ between Monterrey and San Luis Potosí.
The photo.
The photo.
Have we arrived in heaven?
Have we arrived in heaven?

BAJA CALIFORNIA

1,000 MILES OF DUST, DIRT, ROCKS AND CACTUS.  THE FIRST LEG OF OUR 10,000 MILE JOURNEY STARTED OFF WITH SOME SURPRISES.

DAY 1 ORANGE COUNTY – SAN QUINTIN

Our grand Mexican entrance was welcomed by a 3 hour goose hunt for an immigration office tucked away in some random industrial park.  The man in charge of giving us our tourist cards and vehicle permits was the sole employee of an 8×8 office with one chair for the american victims.  There was no line. Apparently no one wants to come to Mexico…  After paying $30 and a $300 deposit on the motorcycles (so we don´t sell them) we scrambled through some tijuana political protesting to the blessed ´1´. The Baja transpeninsular highway.  Only 1,000 miles to Cabo.

The rest of the first day was for the most part uneventful.  We did have a quick run in with a few machine gun toting police officers who wanted to ask us as many questions as they could in one breath.  Apparently, we passed their examination.  We continued onto San Quintin the first night and paid some RV camp owner $5 to let us stay the night on his lawn in front of some sand dunes on the beach.

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some last minute preparations
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the ´lawn´

DAY 2 SAN QUINTIN – SANTA ROSALÍA

The next morning we woke up, got stuck in some sand dunes and got back on the highway.  It would be our longest day on the road.  388 miles passing through some beautiful windy mountain passes, and long straight expanses of cactus forrests.  yup.  cactus forrests.  As far as the eye can see.  Our day drew to an end as we passed the volcano de los tres virgenes then arrived at the sea of cortez and the city of Rosalía.  We grabbed some tacos, made some friends, and found a secluded beach a few miles south of the city.

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getting stuck in some dunes. we soon realized the weight doesn´t help our cause in sand.
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between San Quintin and Santa Rosalía
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Our campsite in Santa Rosalía along the sea of cortez
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the next day going for a morning dip. I stepped on an urchin right after this… I hope that´s not too bad for my health. I had to pull something out of my foot.

DAY 3 SANTA ROSALÍA – LA PAZ

Our third day started off with some of the most beautiful scenery i´ve seen.  Jagged mountains and a highway cutting like a roller coaster above crystal clear water and white sandy coves.  The day got even more interesting when at highway speeds a strap from Chase´s sleeping bag got wedged in his brake rotor and realed in the entire thing, locking up his back tire.  He laid down a solid 30 feet of rubber with his back tire before he was forced off the elevated highway onto the dirt slope.  Quite a talented maneuver for someone faced with oncoming traffic!  We got the sleeping bag out of the rear tire and the bike came to life like nothing happened.  We both recognized that their would be risks associated with a trip like this, but neither of us expected something like this on day 3.  Haha, hopefully not a sign of more of what´s to come.  On the positive side, that little stunt awoke in us an ability to tie incredible knots and helped us develop new tie-down skills never known to man.  That night we pulled into La Paz, ate some hamburgers and found a nice little beach just south of the city.

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Arriving at the scene of the crash. All smiles. The highway was elevated about 10 feet above the dirt road to the side.
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the tread marks from the locked up tire
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RIP sleeping bag

DAY 4 LA PAZ – CABO SAN LUCAS

The fourth day in Baja was much more mellow.  We spent a few hours trying to buy ferry tickets to the mainland and getting a new sleeping bag 🙂  Then it was off to Cabo. along the way we saw a big crowd of people under an overpass and decided to check out the action.  Turns out they were running a 100 mile baja race .  A few guys from one of the pit crews invited us over to sit with them in the shade and drink a coke.  It was pretty funny to see a race like that without any protection between us and the race.  I could get as close as i wanted to the trucks that sped by our little pit crew.  We finished the day passing through Cabo for tacos and found a beautiful beach along the Pacific all to ourselves.

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The view from our tent
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Riding south of La Paz. The water was INCREDIBLE!
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coming into Cabo
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Our arch nemesis. SAND.
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we ended up camping just over this hill. photos got erased on my phone…

DAY 5 CABO SAN LUCAS – LA PAZ FERRY – TOPOLOBAMPO (MAINLAND)

We simply woke up, rode to La Paz, boarded the ferry.  It´s an 8 hour journey to the mainland but we found a couple dudes on a surf trip in their rhino-lined 4runner to chat with.  If everything goes well, we´ll be in Culiacán tonight.

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somewhere between La Paz and Cabo San Lucas
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swim break before getting on the ferry in La Paz
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boarding the ferry