BAJA CALIFORNIA

1,000 MILES OF DUST, DIRT, ROCKS AND CACTUS.  THE FIRST LEG OF OUR 10,000 MILE JOURNEY STARTED OFF WITH SOME SURPRISES.

DAY 1 ORANGE COUNTY – SAN QUINTIN

Our grand Mexican entrance was welcomed by a 3 hour goose hunt for an immigration office tucked away in some random industrial park.  The man in charge of giving us our tourist cards and vehicle permits was the sole employee of an 8×8 office with one chair for the american victims.  There was no line. Apparently no one wants to come to Mexico…  After paying $30 and a $300 deposit on the motorcycles (so we don´t sell them) we scrambled through some tijuana political protesting to the blessed ´1´. The Baja transpeninsular highway.  Only 1,000 miles to Cabo.

The rest of the first day was for the most part uneventful.  We did have a quick run in with a few machine gun toting police officers who wanted to ask us as many questions as they could in one breath.  Apparently, we passed their examination.  We continued onto San Quintin the first night and paid some RV camp owner $5 to let us stay the night on his lawn in front of some sand dunes on the beach.

IMG_0153
some last minute preparations
IMG_0156
the ´lawn´

DAY 2 SAN QUINTIN – SANTA ROSALÍA

The next morning we woke up, got stuck in some sand dunes and got back on the highway.  It would be our longest day on the road.  388 miles passing through some beautiful windy mountain passes, and long straight expanses of cactus forrests.  yup.  cactus forrests.  As far as the eye can see.  Our day drew to an end as we passed the volcano de los tres virgenes then arrived at the sea of cortez and the city of Rosalía.  We grabbed some tacos, made some friends, and found a secluded beach a few miles south of the city.

IMG_0158
getting stuck in some dunes. we soon realized the weight doesn´t help our cause in sand.
DCIM101GOPRO
between San Quintin and Santa Rosalía
IMG_0163
Our campsite in Santa Rosalía along the sea of cortez
IMG_0169
the next day going for a morning dip. I stepped on an urchin right after this… I hope that´s not too bad for my health. I had to pull something out of my foot.

DAY 3 SANTA ROSALÍA – LA PAZ

Our third day started off with some of the most beautiful scenery i´ve seen.  Jagged mountains and a highway cutting like a roller coaster above crystal clear water and white sandy coves.  The day got even more interesting when at highway speeds a strap from Chase´s sleeping bag got wedged in his brake rotor and realed in the entire thing, locking up his back tire.  He laid down a solid 30 feet of rubber with his back tire before he was forced off the elevated highway onto the dirt slope.  Quite a talented maneuver for someone faced with oncoming traffic!  We got the sleeping bag out of the rear tire and the bike came to life like nothing happened.  We both recognized that their would be risks associated with a trip like this, but neither of us expected something like this on day 3.  Haha, hopefully not a sign of more of what´s to come.  On the positive side, that little stunt awoke in us an ability to tie incredible knots and helped us develop new tie-down skills never known to man.  That night we pulled into La Paz, ate some hamburgers and found a nice little beach just south of the city.

IMG_0170
Arriving at the scene of the crash. All smiles. The highway was elevated about 10 feet above the dirt road to the side.
IMG_0175
the tread marks from the locked up tire
IMG_0174
RIP sleeping bag

DAY 4 LA PAZ – CABO SAN LUCAS

The fourth day in Baja was much more mellow.  We spent a few hours trying to buy ferry tickets to the mainland and getting a new sleeping bag 🙂  Then it was off to Cabo. along the way we saw a big crowd of people under an overpass and decided to check out the action.  Turns out they were running a 100 mile baja race .  A few guys from one of the pit crews invited us over to sit with them in the shade and drink a coke.  It was pretty funny to see a race like that without any protection between us and the race.  I could get as close as i wanted to the trucks that sped by our little pit crew.  We finished the day passing through Cabo for tacos and found a beautiful beach along the Pacific all to ourselves.

DCIM101GOPRO
The view from our tent
DCIM101GOPRO
Riding south of La Paz. The water was INCREDIBLE!
DCIM101GOPRO
coming into Cabo
DCIM101GOPRO
Our arch nemesis. SAND.
IMG_0183
we ended up camping just over this hill. photos got erased on my phone…

DAY 5 CABO SAN LUCAS – LA PAZ FERRY – TOPOLOBAMPO (MAINLAND)

We simply woke up, rode to La Paz, boarded the ferry.  It´s an 8 hour journey to the mainland but we found a couple dudes on a surf trip in their rhino-lined 4runner to chat with.  If everything goes well, we´ll be in Culiacán tonight.

DCIM101GOPRO
somewhere between La Paz and Cabo San Lucas
IMG_0186
swim break before getting on the ferry in La Paz
DCIM101GOPRO
boarding the ferry
Advertisements

16 thoughts on “BAJA CALIFORNIA

  1. Aron, this is amazing. I love reading the details of your adventure. I’m excited to read more. Keep safe!!!

  2. So far you’ve been in my former mission boundaries (hasta Culiacan). Sadly, I didn’t spend any time at the beach, though I did get a similar shakedown by machine gun totin’ officers once.

  3. Wow! Sounds like an amazing and truly unforgettable adventure. Your mom will breathe a sigh of relief now that you’ve started this blog. 🙂

  4. Aron and Chase – Stay safe and many mahalos for taking me on this trip with you. Glad to hear about the knot tying expertise – keep it up and ENJOY! Grandma P.S. Aron – your Mom is not the only one waiting for your words!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s